Three things to do to ramp your Book Sales


Amazon Bestseller
Two and a half years after I published my novel, it is still selling several copies a day.

Earlier today it had a sales rank of 50K (see the above screenshot). Sales have certainly declined from where they peaked about nine months after I published, but sales continue at a steady pace. And my novel is in a pretty small niche, so book sales have only so much upside in this niche.

My book is priced at $1.49, and it has been at that price for almost the entire time it has been for sale on Amazon, so I’m not wracking up sales by selling it at $.99.

Below you can see my Author Rank as tracked by Amazon. Even two and a half years after I launched my book it is still doing better than it did the month after I launched it. Again — see my blog on keywords. That dip the month after I published my book was because I did not know what I was doing (like most indies) with keywords. After that, I got my keywords figured out and my sales did much better.

Amazon Author Central

I’m going to cut to the chase on why it continues to sell so well. There are three primary reasons, three things that anyone can do ramp their book sales and keep them up. Continue reading “Three things to do to ramp your Book Sales”

The Red Violin… Up Close and Personal

Red Violin

This afternoon we had a chance to hear the extraordinarily talented Elizabeth Pitcairn play the legendary “Red Mendelssohn” Stradivarius violin of 1720. It is the same “Red Violin” about which the movie was made… Sort of. When asked how accurate the movie was, she smiled and politely assured us that, “The movie is based on history about which we know nothing.”

Another funny story she told was the day as a teenager she answered the phone to be told it was an auction house calling to let them know the violin — which had once been in their family — was coming up for auction, and that if they were interested it would probably go for about $1.2 million. She said she decided to get her mon on the phone at that point.

As to the concert… The sound was amazing. It always fascinates me when I hear master musicians. The sound they can make seems to transcend what the physical device is capable of, and they seem to do it with such ease.

I often spend Sunday afternoons watching football or trying to get some writing done… This was a nice change.

A writer’s life… And raccoons, deer, hawks, owls and spiders

Dog and deer, Trevose and buck

This morning, while I was sitting on the deck doing some writing, our dog (Trevose — named after the street we lived on in Singapore, where we adopted her from the humane society) and a buck had a conversation through our back fence.

Moments before, a huge owl had been sitting on a limb not far above where the buck was standing in this picture. And there used to be a famiy of hawks that lived in a nearby tree, but they seem to have departed about a month ago. We have a couple hummingbird feeders, but there seems only two that frequent them. And we have a squirrel with a black head and a brown body that crosses the deck from time to time. There is a downside…

Continue reading “A writer’s life… And raccoons, deer, hawks, owls and spiders”

Why the Population Bomb bombed

Population Bomb, The Population Bomb, Paul Ehrlich

This book came up in a discussion I was having earlier today. Published in 1968, and an eventual bestseller, The Population Bomb asserted that within 10 – 20 years the world would be wracked by starvation and wars for food.

In my early teens in the ’70s I lived in a small town in western Kansas surrounded by literally an ocean of wheat that farmers were going broke producing because the world had too damn much of it. So I could not reconcile the dire warnings of “The Population Bomb” and the reality around me.

At least until the famous “bet”.
Continue reading “Why the Population Bomb bombed”

James Gunn and the role of Science Fiction

Analog Science Fiction, Analog Sci Fi, Analog Science Fiction Science Fact, Analog Magazine

I grew up reading Analog Science Fiction magazine. In fairness, it is more accurately Analog Science Fiction and Fact, but I always did better with the fiction part than I did the fact part.

Later in life, while earning my MA in Creative Writing, I had the chance to study under James Gunn at the University of Kansas. Gunn has published a number of science fiction novels over the last ~50 years, but he is probably better known in the sci fi community as a historian of science fiction and has published a number of books to that end.

I took three or four classes from him, and I spent some time chatting with him in his office, which was as you would imagine it: Stacked high with paperbacks on every flat surface, he was staring into the small screen of his antiquated computer. He eventually chaired my thesis committee.

As luck would have it, he came to our wedding. For a wedding gift — in typical Gunn fashion — he handed me a couple of his most recent paperbacks. 

He is the author of the guest editorial in Analog this month and has written an interesting article on the role of science fiction with some focus on Star Trek and Star Wars. Check it out.