Best Grammar Checker Poll: Which one is most helpful?

Grammar checker software can be a big help.
Grammar checker software can be a big help whether it is local or online. It is one of your most helpful tools as a writer.

Which are the best Grammar Checkers? Which one is most helpful to you? Do you prefer a Microsoft Word Plug in or something that works online with Chrome, for instance? Do they help your writing craft?

I’m interested in your feedback. And your feedback will guide other writers to the most effective tools.

Vote in the Grammar Checker poll on the next page.

Cast your vote below for your favorite Grammar Checker! (Poll now closed)

Grammarly ProWritingAid Ginger Whitesmoke Afterthededline

 

I’ll soon provide some thoughts on the poll results and related writing tips about how to use such grammar checkers most effectively.

Thanks for voting!

Grammar Checkers can help your writing craft. and how to write a book

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Best Grammar Checker Poll: Which one is most helpful?
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Best Grammar Checker Poll: Which one is most helpful?
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Which are the best Grammar Checkers? Which one is most helpful to you? Do you prefer a Microsoft Word Plug in or something that works online with Chrome, for instance? Do they help your writing craft?
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Tiffany Writing
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2 thoughts on “Best Grammar Checker Poll: Which one is most helpful?”

  1. They’re are several free grammar checkers, not listed here. Admittedly, they are more limited. Of interest are the Word macros out there, several people rewrote the original grammar macros put out nearly a decade ago.

    Of those you list:
    1. Grammarly. A no-go for me. Unless you are welded to a high reliability hard-line (no WiFi), Grammarly refuses to recognize your license and even disables itself. In addition, the off-line version embeds weird punctuation such as [. .] and [, ,] (not the brackets). Their help line is the most unhelpful.
    2. Autocrit. New and improved UI. It takes away the geekiness of the old UI, and is more ‘friendly.’ For this geek, I prefer the geeky UI. Comprehensive, the list of what it checks for is one of the longest. Like all cut and paste from off-line to on-line, it has issues, but is probably the least glitchy. My go-to tool. Their help line is responsive.
    3. Hemingway. More amusing than useful. I use it to contrast my style with the mythical Hemingway. As such, I get a valuable read of what I’m doing. As the WSJ pointed out, the real-world Hemingway flunks the “Hemingway.” Didn’t check their help line.

  2. Great feedback. Thanks! I actually like the Hemingway App as a very quick tool that helps me spot overly complex sentences. And I do like AutoCrit, but wish it had a Word plug in.

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